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How to Get OpenJDK 6 Packages for Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, and Other Linux Distributions


How to Download OpenJDK 6




If you are looking for a free and open-source implementation of the Java SE 6 specification, you may want to consider using OpenJDK 6. In this article, we will explain what OpenJDK 6 is, why you may want to use it, how to install it on different operating systems, what are its advantages and disadvantages, and what are some alternatives to it.


What is OpenJDK 6?




OpenJDK 6 is an open-source implementation of the Java SE 6 specification. It was released in 2007 as a result of the development that Sun Microsystems started in 2006. It consists of a Java Virtual Machine (HotSpot), a Java Class Library, and a Java compiler (javac).




download openjdk 6



An open-source implementation of Java SE 6




OpenJDK 6 is licensed under the GNU General Public License version 2 (GPLv2) with a linking exception. This means that anyone can download, use, modify, and distribute the source code and binaries of OpenJDK 6 without paying any fees or royalties. The linking exception allows applications that use OpenJDK 6 to remain under their own license terms.


A reference implementation of Java SE 6




OpenJDK 6 is also an official reference implementation of the Java SE 6 specification. This means that it complies with the standards and requirements defined by the Java Community Process (JCP) for Java SE 6. Various binaries derived from OpenJDK 6 sources passed the Java SE 6 Test Compatibility Kit (TCK) suite, which verifies the conformance of a Java implementation.


A project maintained by the OpenJDK community




OpenJDK 6 is also a project maintained by the OpenJDK community, which consists of developers from various organizations and individuals who contribute to the development and improvement of OpenJDK. The project was dissolved in February 2023 as Oracle stopped providing public updates and security patches for Oracle JDK 6. However, the OpenJDK community continues to provide updates and fixes for OpenJDK 6 through the JDK Updates Project.


Why use OpenJDK 6?




There are several reasons why you may want to use OpenJDK 6 for your Java applications. Here are some of them:


It is free and open-source




As mentioned earlier, OpenJDK 6 is licensed under the GPLv2 with a linking exception, which means that you can use it without paying any fees or royalties. You can also access and modify the source code and binaries of OpenJDK 6 according to your needs. You can also contribute to the OpenJDK community by submitting patches, bug reports, or feature requests.


It values stability, compatibility, and security




OpenJDK 6 is designed to be stable, compatible, and secure. It follows the Java SE 6 specification, which ensures that it works with existing Java applications and libraries that are based on Java SE 6. It also receives regular security updates and bug fixes from the OpenJDK community, which helps to keep it safe and reliable.


It supports multiple platforms and architectures




OpenJDK 6 is available for various operating systems and architectures, such as Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, Solaris, BSD, AIX, and others. You can download the binaries or the source code of OpenJDK 6 from the official website or from other sources that provide OpenJDK builds.


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How to install OpenJDK 6 on different operating systems?




The installation process of OpenJDK 6 may vary depending on the operating system and the type of package you choose. Here are some general steps for installing OpenJDK 6 on different operating systems:


Windows




There are two ways to install OpenJDK 6 on Windows: using a packaged installer or using a compressed JDK.


Using a packaged installer




A packaged installer is a file that contains the binaries and configuration files of OpenJDK 6. It also creates shortcuts and registry entries for OpenJDK 6. To use a packaged installer, follow these steps:


  • Download the installer file from a source that provides OpenJDK builds, such as .



  • Run the installer file and follow the instructions on the screen.



  • Select the destination folder for OpenJDK 6 and click Next.



  • Select the features you want to install, such as the Java Development Kit (JDK), the Java Runtime Environment (JRE), or the Source Code.



  • Click Install and wait for the installation to finish.



  • Click Finish to exit the installer.



Using a compressed JDK




A compressed JDK is a file that contains only the binaries of OpenJDK 6. It does not create any shortcuts or registry entries for OpenJDK 6. To use a compressed JDK, follow these steps:


  • Download the compressed JDK file from a source that provides OpenJDK builds, such as .



  • Extract the compressed JDK file to a folder of your choice.



  • Add the bin folder of the extracted JDK to your PATH environment variable. This will allow you to run Java commands from any location.



Setting the JAVA_HOME environment variable




The JAVA_HOME environment variable is used by some applications and tools to locate the Java installation directory. To set the JAVA_HOME environment variable, follow these steps:


  • Right-click on My Computer and select Properties.



  • Select Advanced system settings and click on Environment Variables.



  • Under System variables, click on New.



  • Type JAVA_HOME as the variable name and type the path of your JDK installation folder as the variable value. For example, C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.6.0_45.



  • Click OK to save the changes.



Linux




There are two ways to install OpenJDK 6 on Linux: using a package manager or using a compressed JDK.


Using a package manager




A package manager is a tool that allows you to install, update, and remove software packages on your system. Different Linux distributions may use different package managers, such as apt, yum, dnf, pacman, or zypper. To use a package manager to install OpenJDK 6, follow these steps:


  • Open a terminal and update your package list. For example, if you are using Ubuntu or Debian, you can use the command sudo apt update.



  • Search for the available OpenJDK 6 packages. For example, if you are using Ubuntu or Debian, you can use the command apt search openjdk-6.



  • Select the package that matches your system architecture and preferences. For example, if you want to install the JDK for 64-bit systems, you can use the package openjdk-6-jdk.



  • Install the selected package using the appropriate command. For example, if you are using Ubuntu or Debian, you can use the command sudo apt install openjdk-6-jdk.



  • Verify that the installation was successful by running the command java -version. You should see something like this:



java version "1.6.0_45" OpenJDK Runtime Environment (IcedTea6 1.13.13) (6b45-1.13.13-1deb7u1) OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 23.45-b02, mixed mode)


Using a compressed JDK




A compressed JDK is a file that contains only the binaries of OpenJDK 6. It does not cre


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