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Substance Abuse A Leading Factor In Child Abuse And Neglect Cases [REPACK]



Risk factors are characteristics that may increase the likelihood of experiencing or perpetrating child abuse and neglect, but they may or may not be direct causes. A combination of individual, relational, community, and societal factors contribute to the risk of child abuse and neglect. Although children are not responsible for the harm inflicted upon them, certain factors have been found to increase their risk of being abused and or neglected.




Substance Abuse A Leading Factor in Child Abuse and Neglect Cases



A greater understanding of risk factors can help professionals working with children and families to identify stressors and situations that put them at increased risk for child abuse and neglect and intervene and support them before maltreatment occurs. It must be emphasized, however, that while certain factors often are present among families where maltreatment occurs, this does not mean that the presence of these factors causes child abuse and neglect.


Certain conditions or attributes, called protective factors, may lessen the likelihood of children being abused or neglected. By identifying protective factors, professionals can acquire a more holistic view of family experiences and engage with other service providers in developing a multiservice system response. Understanding the role of protective factors is as important as recognizing risk factors.


Child Maltreatment 2019 Author(s)United States. Children's Bureau. AvailabilityViewDownload (PDF - 0KB)Year Published2021 This annual report summarizes child abuse statistics submitted by States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS) during federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2019. The data are presented in aggregate and by State, and trends are reported when available. Statistics are presented for the following: referrals and reports of child maltreatment, characteristics of victims and nonvictims, fatalities that occurred as a result of maltreatment, characteristics of perpetrators of maltreatment, and services to prevent maltreatment and to assist children and families. The final chapter presents analyses of specific subsets of children. During FFY 2019, an estimated 656,000 children were determined to be victims of abuse or neglect, a decrease from FFY 2018; the number of children who received a child protective services investigation response or alternative response decreased to 3,476,000 in 2019; 84.5% of victims suffer a single type of maltreatment, with 61% suffering neglect only, 10.3% suffering physical abuse only, and 7.2% suffering sexual abuse only; children in their first year of life have the highest rate of victimization at 25.7 per 1,000 children; American-Indian or Alaska Native children have the highest rate of victimization at 14.8 per 1,000 in the population of the same race or ethnicity, and African American children have the second highest rate at 13.7 per 1,000; 83% of perpetrators are between the ages of 18 and 44, 53% are female, 48.9% are White, and 77.5% are a parent to their victim; 60.8% of victims and 27.7% of nonvictims received post-response services; 29 States reported 877 unique victims of sex trafficking in FFY 2019; and an estimated 1,840 children died of abuse and neglect at a rate of 2.50 per 100,000 children in the national population, an increase from the 1,780 in FFY 2018. Numerous tables and figures. Promoting Protective Factors for In-Risk Families and Youth: A Guide for Practitioners Series TitleFactsheetsAuthor(s)Development Services Group, Inc.; Child Welfare Information Gateway AvailabilityViewDownload (PDF - 397KB) Order bound (Free) Year Published2015 Presents information from a review of current research linking protective factors to well-being for the five in-risk populations served by the Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF): children exposed to domestic violence, homeless and runaway youth, pregnant and parenting teens, victims of child abuse and neglect, and youth in and aging out of foster care. Topics include individual skills and capacities that can improve the well-being of children and youth; how parents, guardians, and others can contribute to the well-being of these children; and strategies for practitioners. A model framework for organizing and applying protective factors is included, as well as a table listing specific protective factors for ACYF populations by level of influence. This publication is part of a series of five factsheets for practitioners exploring the importance of protective factors in working with in-risk populations served by ACYF. Promoting Protective Factors for Victims of Child Abuse and Neglect: A Guide for Practitioners Series TitleFactsheetsAuthor(s)Development Services Group, Inc.; Child Welfare Information Gateway AvailabilityViewDownload (PDF - 417KB) Order bound (Free) Year Published2015 Presents information from a review of current research on specific protective factors that carry moderate or strong association with improved well-being for victims of child abuse and neglect. Topics include individual skills and capacities that can improve the well-being of children who have been abused or neglected; how parents, guardians, friends, and other adults can contribute to the well-being of these children and youth; strategies for practitioners; and resources for more information. This publication is part of a series of five factsheets for practitioners exploring the importance of protective factors in working with in-risk populations served by the Administration on Children, Youth and Families.


Risk and Protective FactorsU.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionDescribes individual, family, and community factors associated with child abuse and neglect.


Child abuse and neglect are serious public health problems and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). They can have long-term impacts on health, opportunity, and wellbeing. This issue includes all types of abuse and neglect of a child under the age of 18 by a parent, caregiver, or another person in a custodial role (such as a religious leader, a coach, a teacher) that results in harm, the potential for harm, or threat of harm to a child. There are four common types of abuse and neglect:


For more information about preventing child abuse and neglect definitions please see Child Maltreatment Surveillance: Uniform Definitions for Public Health and Recommended Data Elements pdf icon[4.12 MB, 148 Pages, 508].


Child abuse and neglect are common. At least 1 in 7 children have experienced child abuse or neglect in the past year in the United States. This is likely an underestimate because many cases are unreported. In 2020, 1,750 children died of abuse and neglect in the United States.


Children living in poverty experience more abuse and neglect. Experiencing poverty can place a lot of stress on families, which may increase the risk for child abuse and neglect. Rates of child abuse and neglect are 5 times higher for children in families with low socioeconomic status.


Child maltreatment is costly. In the United States, the total lifetime economic burden associated with child abuse and neglect was about $592 billion in 2018. This economic burden rivals the cost of other high-profile public health problems, such as heart disease and diabetes.


Children who are abused and neglected may suffer immediate physical injuries such as cuts, bruises, or broken bones. They may also have emotional and psychological problems, such as anxiety or posttraumatic stress.


Over the long term, children who are abused or neglected are also at increased risk for experiencing future violence victimization and perpetration, substance abuse, sexually transmitted infections, delayed brain development, lower educational attainment, and limited employment opportunities.


Child abuse and neglect are preventable. Certain factors may increase or decrease the risk of perpetrating or experiencing child abuse and neglect. To prevent child abuse and neglect violence, we must understand and address the factors that put people at risk for or protect them from violence. Everyone benefits when children have safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments. CDC developed Preventing Child Abuse & Neglect: A Technical Package for Policy, Norm, and Programmatic Activities pdf icon[4 MB, 52 Pages, 508] to help communities use the best available evidence to prevent child abuse and neglect. This resource is available in English and Spanish pdf icon[21MB, 52 Pages, 508] and can impact individual behaviors and relationships, family, community, and societal factors that influence risk and protective factors for child abuse and neglect.


Different types of violence are connected and often share root causes. Child abuse and neglect are linked to other forms of violence through shared risk and protective factors. Addressing and preventing one form of violence may have an impact on preventing other forms of violence.


An abused child may exhibit signs of guilt, shame or confusion. If the abuse involves a parent, relative, or family friend, it is likely he/she will be afraid to tell anyone about the maltreatment and develop a noticeable fear or discomfort when around parents, adult caregivers or family friends. It is vital to be on the alert for such red flags.


CASA Child Advocates of Montgomery County is dedicated to protecting the best interests of every abused or neglected child and ultimately break the cycle of child abuse, one child at a time. Someday, child abuse and neglect will hopefully be eliminated completely. Until that time, CASA needs volunteers to make a difference in the lives of children who have suffered from abuse and/or neglect.


CASA is dedicated to protecting the best interests of every abused or neglected child and ultimately break the cycle of child abuse, one child at a time. We need caring volunteers to assist with the numerous cases of child abuse and neglect.


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